Tag Archives: islamic archaeology

Samarra workshop Durham/online 27th June

Department of Archaeology, Durham University

Landscapes of Complex Society Research Group/ Durham Centre for Cultural Heritage Protection

The Abbasid capital at Samarra: the current situation and its research potential

Monday 27th June 13:00-16:00 (BST)

Samarra, located 100 km north of Baghdad, was the Abbasid capital between its foundation in 836 AD/CE until about 892 AD/CE. At 5,800 hectares extending 40km along the Tigris, and with the plans of around 6,400 separate buildings recorded, it is one the largest archaeological sites in the world and without doubt the most important evidence available for the nature of Abbasid urban layout. The site also holds the answers to many important questions about the nature of Abbasid society and power. Yet the extensive remains are steadily being destroyed through development and agriculture.

Following the publication of the Historical Topography of Samarra (Northedge 2005) and the Archaeological Atlas of Samarra (Northedge and Kennet 2015) this workshop is intended to take a look at the current condition of the site and to discuss plans for future research.

13:00 Derek Kennet Introduction; An Outline of Samarra and its development

13:30 Alastair Northedge The Samarra Archaeological Survey, potential, evolving technology, and achievements in context

14:00 William Deadman The Samarra Atlas GIS archive: assessing damage and threats to the site using remote sensing

14:25 Tea/coffee

14:50 Peter Brown Water supply and water-use at Samarra: exploring the evidence and potential for future research

15:10 Tim Power Samarra – Horizons, Near and Far

15:30 Discussion

16:00 Close

The workshop will be held in person in room D210 in the Dawson Building, Durham University and also online at the following Zoom link:

Click on this Zoom link to register:

https://durhamuniversity.zoom.us/j/98001434828?pwd=ZHNaQzJJbGs2WGlvRUtNK043QnJKdz09

Attendance in both formats is free and all are welcome to come along to listen and to contribute to the discussion.

New publication: H. Kirchner, F. Sabaté (eds.), Agricultural Landscapes of Al-Andalus, and the Aftermath of the Feudal Conquest

Agricultural Landscapes of Al-Andalus, and the Aftermath of the Feudal Conquest

H. Kirchner, F. Sabaté (eds.)

277 p., 22 b/w ill. + 40 maps (36 b&w, 4 colour), 8 b/w tables, 1 b/w line art, 156 x 234 mm, 2021
ISBN: 978-2-503-59397-5
Languages: English

The publication is available.
Retail price: EUR 80,00 excl. tax

Brings together significant, recent research on agricultural systems in al-Andalus, undertaken from an archaeological perspective, with particular reference to irrigated and drained areas, dry agriculture field systems, and pasturelands.

This volume presents recent archaeological research on the agriculture and society of al-Andalus during the Middle Ages, especially from the perspective of ‘hydraulic archaeology’ — an avenue of research developed by Spanish researchers which focuses on the analysis of irrigation systems created by Islamic colonists from the eighth century onwards. More recently, this research perspective has incorporated the analysis of other agricultural systems, such as dryland agriculture and pasturelands. All of these agricultural regimes are complementary in peasant-led subsistence agricultural systems. From a methodological perspective, this archaeological approach is highly innovative, and uses a wide range of techniques (aerial photography, cartographical analysis, field survey, archival research, and archaeological excavation) in order to outline the size and boundaries of cultivation and grazing areas, to define specific plots of land and the related road networks, and to identify other associated facilities, such as watermills.

In connection with these topics, several issues are discussed: the earmarking of rural or urban farming areas for irrigation, draining, or dryland agriculture; the process of construction and the subsequent evolution of these farming areas; the transformations undergone by these areas after the feudal conquest; and, finally, the identification of pasturelands and the analysis of the evidence concerning their management.

Helena Kirchneris Professor of Medieval History and Archaeology and a member of the research group Agrarian Archaeology of the Middle Ages (2017SGR1073) at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

Flocel Sabbate Curul is a Professor of Medieval History at the University of Lleida.

Table of Contents

Introduction. Research on Irrigation, Drainage, Dry Agriculture and Pastures in Al-Andalus — HELENA KIRCHNERPeasant Irrigation Systems

Agrarian Spaces and the Network of Andalusi Settlements of Manacor (Mallorca) — EUGÈNIA SITJES

Watermills in Ibiza (Balearic Islands): A Documentary and Archaeological Case Study in Santa Eulàlia des Riu — ANTONI FERRER, HELENA KIRCHNER

Morphology of Irrigated Spaces in Late Medieval Mudejar Settlements: The Canal of Lorca (Riba-roja de Turia, Valencia) — ENRIC GUINOTUrban Irrigated Areas

Searching for the Origin: A New Interpretation for the Horta of Valencia in Times of Al-Andalus — FERRAN ESQUILACHE

Drainage and Irrigation Systems in MadīnaṬurṭūša(Tortosa, Spain) (8th-12th Centuries) — HELENA KIRCHNER, ARNALD PUY, ANTONI VIRGILIDry Farming and Pasturelands

On Dry Farming in al-Andalus — FÈLIX RETAMERO

On the Problem of Andalusi Dry Farming: Aialt (Castell de Castells), a Qarya with no Irrigation System in the Mountains of Valencia — JOSEP TORRÓ

Deciphering Islamic Landscape in the Eastern Ebro Valley: Almunias and Livestock — JESÚS BRUFAL

Irrigated Pasturelands in Mountain Ranges in the South-East Of the Iberian Peninsula — ANTONIO MALPICA, SONIA VILLAR, GUILLERMO GARCÍA-CONTRERAS

International Workshop – “Medieval Archaeology in Ethiopia”, 09/03/2022

Wednesday 9, March 2022, 9:00-17:30, MMSH, salle Georges Duby, Aix-en-Provence. The one-day workshop is organized by the ERC HornEast and aims to present the recent research of different teams working in Ethiopia. Organizers: Amélie Chekroun, Simon Dorso & Julien Loiseau

Morning Programm
9:00 – Welcoming coffee
9:15-9:30: Pr. Julien Loiseau, Dr. Simon Dorso
Introduction to the workshop
9:30 – 10:00:
Pr. Timothy Insoll (Al-Qasimi Chair in African and Islamic Archaeology, Centre for Islamic Archaeology, Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies,
University of Exeter)
Archaeological Perspectives on Contacts between Cairo and Eastern Ethiopia in the 12th to 15th Centuries

10:20 : Coffee Break

10:30-11:00
Hannah Parsons-Morgan (al-Qasimi Doctoral Researcher, Centre for Islamic Archaeology, University of Exeter, ERC Becoming Muslim)
Chinese Ceramic Consumption in the Horn of Africa: Materialities and Modification at Mediaeval Harlaa, Eastern Ethiopia
11:20-11:50
Dr. Nicholas Tait (Centre for Islamic Archaeology, Institute for Arab and Islamic Studies, University of Exeter) The Development of Local Ceramics from Harlaa, Eastern Ethiopia, in a Regional Perspective


12:10-12:30 : Discussion


12:30- 13:30 : Lunch

Afternoon Programm
13:30-14:00
Dr. Hiluf Behre (Mekelle University, Collège de France)
The palace at Gud Bahri: its Functions from Residence, Metal Workshop
to a Place of Worship
14:20-14:50 :
Dr. Simon Dorso (ERC HornEast, IREMAM, Aix-Marseille University)
The Muslim Cemeteries of South-Eastern Tigray (Ethiopia): Islamic Burials and Funerary
Practices at the Hearth of the Christian Kingdom

15:10 : Coffee Break

15:30-16:00 :
Dr. Anna Lagaron (ERC HornEast, IREMAM, Aix-Marseille University) & Pr. Julien Loiseau (ERC HornEast, Aix-Marseille University, IREMAM)
The Muslim Funerary Stelae from Bilet and Arra’s Cemeteries (South-Eastern Tigray, Ethiopia): Epigraphy, Materiality and Significance for the History of Early Islam in Ethiopia

16:20-16:50 :
Dr Helina S. Woldekiros (Washington University in St. Louis)
Foodways on Medieval Trade Networks: Provisioning the Afar Salt Caravan route, Northern Ethiopia (1000 CE-1600 CE)


17:10-17:30 : Open discussion and perspectives

Source : https://www.iremam.cnrs.fr/fr/international-workshop-medieval-archaeology-ethiopia

Second Ḥajar Online Workshop, 28 APRIL 2022

Early Islamic agriculture and water management: Talking about a “revolution”

15:45-19:00 (Brussels)

15:45 Case studies

Helena Kirchner, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

The Green Revolution between technique transfer and local adaptation: The making of a new agricultural landscape in al-Andalus

Vladimir Dabrowski, CNRS-National Museum of Natural History (Paris)

What Islamic agricultural revolution in eastern Arabia? Recent archaeobotanical discoveries (1st millennium CE)

Gideon Avni, Israel Antiquities Authority and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem

A “Eurasian exchange”? The penetration of new agricultural and water management technologies into the southern Levant, 6th-10th centuries CE

17:15 Break

17:30 Discussion

Discussant: Chris Wickham, University of Oxford

Discussant: Seven Ağır, Middle East Technical University

General debate and questions

For registration (and zoom link), please write us to hajararchaeology@gmail.com until April 27th.

New Publication: Journal of Islamic Archaeology 8/1

The Journal of Islamic Archaeology is the only journal today devoted to the field of Islamic archaeology on a global scale. The term refers to the archaeological study of Islamic societies, polities, and communities, wherever they are found. It may be considered a type of “historical” archaeology, in which the study of historically (textually) known societies can be studied through a combination of “texts and tell”.

The last issue is available online: https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/issue/view/1954

Contents

The Environment in the Islamic City of Termez (Uzbekistan) Zooarchaeology and Anthracology of a 9th-century tannur

Rodrigo Portero, Agnese Fusaro, Raquel Piqué, Josep M. Gurt, Mikelo Elorza, Sónia Gabriel, Shakir R. Pidaev 1–21

The Different Fates of Architectures

Nicolò Pini 23–51

New Insights from Middle Islamic Ceramics from Jerash

Achim Lichtenberger, Alex Peterson, Silvia Polla, Rubina Raja, Andreas Springer, Heiko Stukenbrok, Carmen Ting 53–86

The Urban Bathhouse in the Islamic Far East Evidence from Kazakhstan

Giles Dawkes, Martin Dow 87–110

Uncovering the Islamic Governmental Citadel of Shahdezh in Isfahan, Iran

Hassan Karimian, Abbasali Ahmadi 111–124

Book reviews:

Dwelling Models of Umayyad Mada’in and Qusur in Greater Syria, by Giuseppe Labisi.

Katarína Mokránová 125–126

Early Islamic North Africa. A New Perspective, by Corisande Fenwick.

Ann Liese Nef 127–129

Broken Cities: A Historical Sociology of Ruins, by Martin Devecka.

Andrew Petersen 130–131

Mercaderes, artesanos y ulemas. Las ciudades de las Coras de Ilbira y Pechina en época Omeya, by Eneko López Martínez de Marigorta.

Elena Salinas 132–134

Islamic Inscriptions in Ferghana and Zhetysu: Arabic-written monuments of the 11th–17th centuries from Kyrgyzstan (Russian), by Vladimir Nastich.

Pierre Simeon 135–137

New publication: Journal of Material Cultures in the Muslim World n°2

Journal of Material Cultures in the Muslim World (MCMW) aims to be a new reference for field archaeologists, art historians, anthropologists, curators, and scholars and students of the (art) history, archaeology, architecture, anthropology & ethnography of the Muslim world. This readership represents a new broader definition of material culture that includes not only artefacts, architectural structures and monuments, but also crafts. The journal also aims to inform (other) disciplines and historiographies, by including (unreviewed) archaeological field surveys for example.
The journal focuses on un(der)explored Muslim regions outside of the Middle East and Nord Africa: sub-Saharan Africa, the Indian Ocean, Central Asia, India, South-East Asia and Europe.
The journal accepts submissions in English, French, German and Spanish and short reports in Arabic, Persian and Turkish with an English abstract.
Submissions should be sent to the Editor-in-Chief, Stéphane Pradines.
Frequency: 1 volume per year, 2 issues per volume.

Articles are available in open access: https://brill.com/view/journals/mcmw/2/1-2/mcmw.2.issue-1-2.xml

Contents

VOLUME 2, NO. 1–2
Editorial 1
ARTICLES
Cut-Out Calligraphy from the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries:
Discussion of Its Origins and Significance and Observations on the Techniques and Tools Used
3
Amélie Couvrat Desvergnes
Alphabets and “Calligraphy” in the Section on Prayers, Special Characteristics of the Quran and Magic Squares in the Inventory of Sultan Bayezid II’s Palace Library 32
Guy Burak
Flirting with the Radical: Intertextuality, Intervisuality, and Gendered Subversions in Manuscripts of Sūz u Gudāz 55
Michael Chagnon
“Talking” Tiles from Vanished Ilkhanid Palaces (Late Thirteenth to Early Fourteenth Centuries): Frieze Luster Tiles with Verses from the Shah-nama 97
Yves Porter
Preconceptions of the Samarra Horizon, Green Splashed Ware and Blue Painted Ware Revisited through Chinese Ceramic Imports (Eighth to Tenth Centuries) 150
Wen Wen
A Religious and Economic Stopover in the Middle of Khorasan-e Razavi 184
Rocco Rante and Meysam Labbaf-Khaniki
Excavations on the Coral Mosques of the Maldives 200
Stéphane Pradines and Fabien Balestra

Professorship (W1 with Tenure Track) for Islamic Archaeology and Art History

The Institute of Archaeological Sciences, Dept. I: Near Eastern and Classical Archaeology, at the Faculty of Linguistics, Cultures and Arts of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt am Main invites applications for the following position as civil servant or public employee starting at the earliest possible date:

Professorship (W1 with Tenure Track) for Islamic Archaeology and Art History

The initial tenure track appointment as Assistant Professor civil servant is for six years (§ 64 of the Higher Education Act of the State of Hessen (HHG)). Upon positive evaluation, the incumbent will be promoted to a permanent position at a higher level (W2). According to § 64 (3) HHG candidates should not have obtained their PhD at Goethe University Frankfurt or should have worked as a researcher at an external institution for at least two years after their PhD. The doctorate should not date back to more than four years.

The establishment of this professorship has been made possible by a grant of the VolkswagenFoundation (Program “World Knowledge – Structural Support for Rare Subjects“). The successful candidate will work to realize the approved research- and teaching-strategy. This includes above all the development of independent research projects, the consolidation and aggrandizement of the subject and the implementation of an international exchange program in cooperation with the Forschungskolleg Humanwissenschaften / Institute for Advanced Studies.

The successful candidate is expected to represent the field of Islamic Archaeology and Art History in research and teaching in its full extent and participate in the establishment of a corresponding BA/MA-curriculum within the archaeological paths of study. The position holder should actively participate in interdisciplinary cooperations of the faculty or the university and the Rhine-Main-University association and in relevant research network initiatives in fields such as History, Art-History, Cultural Anthropology, Byzantine Studies or Islamic Studies. The professorship ought to make intensive efforts to attract third-party funds. Research activities and field-work on an international scale in the relevant areas of the subject are required.

Prerequisites for admission is a doctoral degree in one of the following fields: Archaeology (focus on Islamic Archaeology) or Architectural History / Building History or Art History (focus on Islamic Art History) or Islamic Studies (focus on the material culture of Islam). Besides pedagogic aptitude, knowledge in German language is welcomed; the candidate is expected to be able to hold classes in German after three years. Goethe University emphasis an intensive supervision of students and expects a high presence of its staff at university.
The designated salary for the position is based on the German university pay scale or equivalent. Goethe University is an equal opportunity employer, committed to diversity and inclusion. In particular, we are welcoming applications by qualified women and people with a migrant background. At Goethe University, a special emphasis is placed on creating and sustaining a family-friendly work and research environment. Where applicants are otherwise equally qualified, preference is given to candidates with disabilities or equivalent. The same applies to women in fields in which they are under-represented. For further information regarding the general conditions for professorship appointments, please see: www.vakante-professuren.uni-frankfurt.de.

Scientists who are excellently qualified in research and teaching and can prove internationally visible research achievements are invited to submit their applications with curriculum vitae, credentials and certificates, list of publication, list of courses taught independently, teaching evaluations, list of previous and current third party funding, concept of research strategy and future research projects until 10.12.2021 via email to the Dean of the Faculty of Linguistics, Cultures and Arts of the Goethe University: berufungen-fb09@dlist.uni-frankfurt.de.

For further information please contact Prof. Dr. Dirk Wicke: wicke@em.uni-frankfurt.de.

Webinar: “Revisiting the history of medieval libya”

REVISITING THE HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL LIBYA (7th-16th centuries)

Webinar 2021-2022

Sources, Analyses, Projects

Coordinated by Aurélien MONTEL and Sébastien GARNIER

Although Libya is well studied regarding the Ancient Greco-Latin period, it remains poorly known in the Medieval period. Taking note of this historiographic silence, the webinar Revisiting the History of Medieval Libya (7th-16th centuries) aims to reactivate academic interest in this crucial space within medieval Islam, at the junction of the Maghreb and the East, the Mediterranean and Saharan Africa.

Webinar only, third Wednesday of the month (November to June),
6pm to 7.30pm Central European Time
Webinar login link on request: libyemedievale[at]gmail.com

For programme and informations, see the poster or go to the CIHAM website.