Category Archives: News

New Publication: Journal of Islamic Archaeology 8/1

The Journal of Islamic Archaeology is the only journal today devoted to the field of Islamic archaeology on a global scale. The term refers to the archaeological study of Islamic societies, polities, and communities, wherever they are found. It may be considered a type of “historical” archaeology, in which the study of historically (textually) known societies can be studied through a combination of “texts and tell”.

The last issue is available online: https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/issue/view/1954

Contents

The Environment in the Islamic City of Termez (Uzbekistan) Zooarchaeology and Anthracology of a 9th-century tannur

Rodrigo Portero, Agnese Fusaro, Raquel Piqué, Josep M. Gurt, Mikelo Elorza, Sónia Gabriel, Shakir R. Pidaev 1–21

The Different Fates of Architectures

Nicolò Pini 23–51

New Insights from Middle Islamic Ceramics from Jerash

Achim Lichtenberger, Alex Peterson, Silvia Polla, Rubina Raja, Andreas Springer, Heiko Stukenbrok, Carmen Ting 53–86

The Urban Bathhouse in the Islamic Far East Evidence from Kazakhstan

Giles Dawkes, Martin Dow 87–110

Uncovering the Islamic Governmental Citadel of Shahdezh in Isfahan, Iran

Hassan Karimian, Abbasali Ahmadi 111–124

Book reviews:

Dwelling Models of Umayyad Mada’in and Qusur in Greater Syria, by Giuseppe Labisi.

Katarína Mokránová 125–126

Early Islamic North Africa. A New Perspective, by Corisande Fenwick.

Ann Liese Nef 127–129

Broken Cities: A Historical Sociology of Ruins, by Martin Devecka.

Andrew Petersen 130–131

Mercaderes, artesanos y ulemas. Las ciudades de las Coras de Ilbira y Pechina en época Omeya, by Eneko López Martínez de Marigorta.

Elena Salinas 132–134

Islamic Inscriptions in Ferghana and Zhetysu: Arabic-written monuments of the 11th–17th centuries from Kyrgyzstan (Russian), by Vladimir Nastich.

Pierre Simeon 135–137

New publication: Journal of Material Cultures in the Muslim World n°2

Journal of Material Cultures in the Muslim World (MCMW) aims to be a new reference for field archaeologists, art historians, anthropologists, curators, and scholars and students of the (art) history, archaeology, architecture, anthropology & ethnography of the Muslim world. This readership represents a new broader definition of material culture that includes not only artefacts, architectural structures and monuments, but also crafts. The journal also aims to inform (other) disciplines and historiographies, by including (unreviewed) archaeological field surveys for example.
The journal focuses on un(der)explored Muslim regions outside of the Middle East and Nord Africa: sub-Saharan Africa, the Indian Ocean, Central Asia, India, South-East Asia and Europe.
The journal accepts submissions in English, French, German and Spanish and short reports in Arabic, Persian and Turkish with an English abstract.
Submissions should be sent to the Editor-in-Chief, Stéphane Pradines.
Frequency: 1 volume per year, 2 issues per volume.

Articles are available in open access: https://brill.com/view/journals/mcmw/2/1-2/mcmw.2.issue-1-2.xml

Contents

VOLUME 2, NO. 1–2
Editorial 1
ARTICLES
Cut-Out Calligraphy from the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries:
Discussion of Its Origins and Significance and Observations on the Techniques and Tools Used
3
Amélie Couvrat Desvergnes
Alphabets and “Calligraphy” in the Section on Prayers, Special Characteristics of the Quran and Magic Squares in the Inventory of Sultan Bayezid II’s Palace Library 32
Guy Burak
Flirting with the Radical: Intertextuality, Intervisuality, and Gendered Subversions in Manuscripts of Sūz u Gudāz 55
Michael Chagnon
“Talking” Tiles from Vanished Ilkhanid Palaces (Late Thirteenth to Early Fourteenth Centuries): Frieze Luster Tiles with Verses from the Shah-nama 97
Yves Porter
Preconceptions of the Samarra Horizon, Green Splashed Ware and Blue Painted Ware Revisited through Chinese Ceramic Imports (Eighth to Tenth Centuries) 150
Wen Wen
A Religious and Economic Stopover in the Middle of Khorasan-e Razavi 184
Rocco Rante and Meysam Labbaf-Khaniki
Excavations on the Coral Mosques of the Maldives 200
Stéphane Pradines and Fabien Balestra

CReA-Patrimoine spring school 2022. Visualizing archaeological data: GIS mapping and network modeling

Archaeologists use different methods for visualizing their data – for analysis and for presentation. The international spring school will discuss successful ways to visualize these data and challenges and successes in the application of both GIS and network analysis (NA). Through an integration between theory, studies, and tutored practice, we aim to access the two learnt methods to each participant for independent use.

Monday 4.4.22: open for the public

09:30-10:30 • Registration for workshop participants

10:30-12:00 Introduction to the Spring School + The Importance of (good) Data Visualization in Humanities (part 1) Sébastien DE VALERIOLA(Université libre de Bruxelles & ICHEC)

12:30-14:00>The Importance of (good) Data Visualization in Humanities (part 2), Sébastien DE VALERIOLA (Université libre de Bruxelles & ICHEC)

15:00-16:30 • Keynote

From Mapping to Geospatial Modelling in Archaeology: Where Do We stand, and Where to Go Next?, Philip VERHAGEN (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)

17:00-18:30 • Keynote

Archaeology, Materiality and Geo-Space Half a Century after the “Spatial Turn”, Piraye HACIGÜZELLER (Universiteit Antwerpen)

Tuesday 5.4.22: GIS workshop (9:30-17:30)

Soektin VERVUST (Vrije Universiteit Brussel), Hagit NOL, Jean VANDEN BROECK-PARANT, Mostafa ALSKAF (Université libre de Bruxelles)

Wednesday 6.4.22: open for the public 

10:30-12:00

Network Analysis: Definitions and Basic Concepts

Nicolas RUFFINI-RONZANI (Université catholique de Louvain & Université de Namur), Sébastien DE VALERIOLA (Université libre de Bruxelles & ICHEC)

12:30-14:00

An Introduction to the Gephi Network Analysis Software Nicolas RUFFINI-RONZANI (Université catholique de Louvain & Université de Namur), Sébastien DE VALERIOLA (Université libre de Bruxelles & ICHEC)

15:00-16:30 • SNA case studies

Approaching the Social Networks of Temple Builders in 4th C. BC Greece: Methodological Reflections, Jean VANDEN BROECK-PARANT (Université libre de Bruxelles)

Can We Trust Centrality? The Robustness of Centrality Metrics in Historical Networks, Sébastien DE VALERIOLA (Université libre de Bruxelles & ICHEC)

17:00-18:30 • Keynote

Does Archaeology Need Network Science? Illustrated through Medieval Visibility Networks in the Himalayas and Roman Economic Networks, Tom BRUGHMANS (Aarhus University)

19:00 • Dinner for workshop participants

Thursday 7.4.22: network analysis workshop (9:30-17:30)

Nicolas RUFFINI-RONZANI (Université catholique de Louvain & Université de Namur), Sébastien DE VALERIOLA (Université libre de Bruxelles & ICHEC)

Friday 8.4.22: “Bring Your Own Data” workshop (9:30-15:30)

▶ Who is this for? Twenty PhD students and Postdocswith a preference for:• archaeologists• beginners in both methods (GIS and SNA)• people fluent in English

▶ How much does it cost? 100 €(notice that tuition includes coffee breaks but excludes accommodation, traveling expenses, and food!)

▶ Where and how to apply? Send us an email to visualizing.brussels@gmail.com and we will send you a short questionary (so that we know you and your research better). After a selection process, we will confirm or decline your application. The registration will be finalized after your payment of tuition.

▶ What is the deadline for applying? January 10th, 2022

▶ When are answers given? By February 5th, 2022

▶ What is the deadline for paying tuition? February 28th, 2022

▶ The workshop is organized by: Hagit NOL, Agnès VOKAER, Sébastien DE VALERIOLA, Nicolas RUFFINI-RONZANI, Soektin VERVUST

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement no 801505

Source : https://crea.centresphisoc.ulb.be/fr/evenement/crea-patrimoine-spring-school-2022-visualizing-archaeological-data-gis-mapping-and

Webinar: “Revisiting the history of medieval libya”

REVISITING THE HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL LIBYA (7th-16th centuries)

Webinar 2021-2022

Sources, Analyses, Projects

Coordinated by Aurélien MONTEL and Sébastien GARNIER

Although Libya is well studied regarding the Ancient Greco-Latin period, it remains poorly known in the Medieval period. Taking note of this historiographic silence, the webinar Revisiting the History of Medieval Libya (7th-16th centuries) aims to reactivate academic interest in this crucial space within medieval Islam, at the junction of the Maghreb and the East, the Mediterranean and Saharan Africa.

Webinar only, third Wednesday of the month (November to June),
6pm to 7.30pm Central European Time
Webinar login link on request: libyemedievale[at]gmail.com

For programme and informations, see the poster or go to the CIHAM website.